• Sundays @ 8:00am

 

From the Pastor's Desk

When have I felt visceral emotion when seeing a family member, friend, or stranger in need? Do I turn to God in my need?

RE-OPENING THE CHURCH

Eightteenth Sunday in Ordinary time

The central theme of today’s readings is that God takes care of our physical and spiritual needs, if we put our trust in Him. He shares with us Jesus as our Savior and spiritual food, in Word and in Eucharist, thus preparing us for the Heavenly banquet, and challenges us to share our blessings with others.

In the first reading, Isaiah consoles the Jewish exiles in Babylon, assuring them of their return to homeland and promising them that Yahweh their God alone can and will provide for their spiritual and physical needs. He will pardon their sins and will offer them participation in His eschatological banquet.

Today’s Responsorial Psalm (Ps 145), has us sing, “The Hand of the Lord feeds us; He answers all our needs,” in praise of the mercy, forgiveness and maternal care of a loving and providing God.

In the second reading, Paul argues that since God’s love for us is so immense and infinite, “nothing can come between us and the love of God made visible in Christ Jesus our Lord.”

In today’s Gospel, Jesus demonstrates God’s caring love for us by feeding the people, spiritually by his preaching and physically by the miraculous multiplication of five loaves and two fish, which the apostles had brought for their lunch and which they gave Jesus to feed the people. This miracle shows the Divinity of Jesus, the providing care of God and the compassion of Jesus for the crowd. It is a Messianic sign, presenting Jesus as the new Moses who fed the Israelites in the desert and the new Elisha who miraculously fed the starving people of Gilgal (2 Kings 42-44). The Eucharistic wordings used, and the promise made by Jesus on the following day, that he would give his body and blood as food and drink (John 6:25-70), make the miracle a prefiguring symbol of the Holy Eucharist.

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From the Pastor's Desk

When have I felt visceral emotion when seeing a family member, friend, or stranger in need? Do I turn to God in my need?

RE-OPENING THE CHURCH

Eightteenth Sunday in Ordinary time

The central theme of today’s readings is that God takes care of our physical and spiritual needs, if we put our trust in Him. He shares with us Jesus as our Savior and spiritual food, in Word and in Eucharist, thus preparing us for the Heavenly banquet, and challenges us to share our blessings with others.

In the first reading, Isaiah consoles the Jewish exiles in Babylon, assuring them of their return to homeland and promising them that Yahweh their God alone can and will provide for their spiritual and physical needs. He will pardon their sins and will offer them participation in His eschatological banquet.

Today’s Responsorial Psalm (Ps 145), has us sing, “The Hand of the Lord feeds us; He answers all our needs,” in praise of the mercy, forgiveness and maternal care of a loving and providing God.

In the second reading, Paul argues that since God’s love for us is so immense and infinite, “nothing can come between us and the love of God made visible in Christ Jesus our Lord.”

In today’s Gospel, Jesus demonstrates God’s caring love for us by feeding the people, spiritually by his preaching and physically by the miraculous multiplication of five loaves and two fish, which the apostles had brought for their lunch and which they gave Jesus to feed the people. This miracle shows the Divinity of Jesus, the providing care of God and the compassion of Jesus for the crowd. It is a Messianic sign, presenting Jesus as the new Moses who fed the Israelites in the desert and the new Elisha who miraculously fed the starving people of Gilgal (2 Kings 42-44). The Eucharistic wordings used, and the promise made by Jesus on the following day, that he would give his body and blood as food and drink (John 6:25-70), make the miracle a prefiguring symbol of the Holy Eucharist.

From the Pastor's Desk

What or whom have I overlooked in searching for the kingdom of heaven? How can I develop an understanding heart?

RE-OPENING THE CHURCH

Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary time

Today’s readings teach us keeping a personal relationship with Christ and sharing his view of life are the most beautiful, the most precious things in the world.

The first reading tells us how the young King Solomon opted for the great treasure of accepting God to rule his life by doing God’s will. That is why he requested of God for the gift of prudence, “an understanding heart to distinguish right from wrong, so that he might govern God’s people properly. Yahweh was pleased with his request and granted him a wise and discerning heart which enabled him to surpass everyone in wisdom.

In the second reading, Paul teaches that wisdom to perceive God's grace and use it, is essential for those who want to follow Him and to do His will, thus remaining in His Kingdom. He assures Rome’s Christian community that “all things work for good for those who love God, who are called according to His purpose.”

In the Gospel, using three mini parables and one concluding parable or simile, Jesus teaches us that God’s Kingdom (the rule of God in us, accepting Jesus as our God and Savior, putting our Faith in God and doing His will), is something of extraordinary value, like a hidden treasure or a costly pearl, and that possessing it calls for a total commitment to preserve it. The Kingdom of God is God’s reign in our hearts, in our lives, in our homes, in our society, and in our world. Only those who develop a searching mind and a heart willing to give up everything for the great treasure of God’s Kingdom will be rewarded. Through the first and second parables of the treasure and pearl, Jesus teaches us that identifying God’s will and living according to the Gospel (both with His grace), are the most precious and worthwhile things in life. Through Jesus and his Gospel, we come to know and understand the real meaning of life, the will of God for us each day, and the most important things we must do to secure our eternal salvation.

From the Pastor's Desk

Readings: July 19, 2020 Reading I: Wisdom 12:13, 16-19 Responsorial: Psalm 86 Reading II: Romans 8:26-27 Gospel: Matthew 13: 24-43

RE-OPENING THE CHURCH

Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary time

Today’s readings are about the transforming power of the word of God when read, preached, and lived. They also warn us not to be disappointed at the absence of immediate results. We must take a positive and optimistic view of our missionary efforts, as we keep on bearing witness to Christ’s Gospel. The parable of the sower in today’s Gospel challenges us to listen intently to God’s Word, to be open to it, and to allow our lives to be shaped by its power. The parable reminds us that man’s reception of God’s Word is determined by the condition of his heart.

In the first reading, Isaiah consoles the Jewish slaves in Babylon, assuring them that, like rain and snow which water the earth so that seeds may sprout and grow, God's word will accomplish its purpose, in this case by returning the exiles to their homes in peace as God promised.

In the second reading, St. Paul reminds us that just as seeds must fall into the earth and die to produce abundant crop, the pain and sufferings God permits in our lives help our redemption. Paul wants us to wait for our eternal reward while we continue sowing the word of God diligently and suffering for the Lord, as he did.

Today’s Gospel teaches us that the word of the Lord is the seed, and our hearts and minds are the soil. The seed’s good spiritual yield in one’s life depends on how fully one willingly accepts and responds to the word of the Lord. The yield arising from the positive response will be abundant beyond all imagining. The parable tells us to do our part by preparing fertile soil in our hearts in which the word of God can germinate, grow, and yield 30-, 60, or 100-fold.

Due to the ongoing Covid-19 Coronavirus Pandemic, Bishop Larry Silva extends the dispensation from the obligation to attend Sunday Mass to all the people of the Diocese of Honolulu and all visitors to the Diocese of Honolulu through August 31, 2020.  All who are able to attend Sunday Mass without putting themselves or others at serious risk of infection; are encouraged to do so, but are not obliged to.

For School Year 2020-2021, some changes will be taking place in the classroom size. Attendance to the Classes will be limited to adhere to the social distancing mandate. Available Classes will be for those children who are preparing or in need of receiving the following sacraments: Reconciliation, Confirmation and Communion.

From the Pastor's Desk

Readings: July 12, 2020
1st Reading: Isaiah 55: 10-11
Responsorial: Psalm 65
2nd Reading: Romans 8: 18-23
Gospel: Matthew 13: 1-23

RE-OPENING THE CHURCH

Fourteenth Sunday in Ordinary time

Introduction: During the U. S. Independence Day celebrations yesterday, Americans probably heard all or part of Emma Lazarus’ poem inscribed on the base of the Statue of Liberty: “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free…. Send these, the homeless tempest-tossed to me.”

Today’s readings, especially the Gospel, give the same message in a more powerful way: "Take my yoke . . . and you will find rest."

In the first reading, the prophet Zechariah consoles the Jews living in Palestine under Greek rule, promising them a “meek” Messianic King of peace riding on a donkey, who will give them rest and liberty.

The Responsorial Psalm (Ps 145) praises and thanks a kind and compassionate God Who “raises up those who are bowed down” under heavy yokes. In the second reading, Paul tells the first-century Christian community in Rome about two yokes, namely, the “flesh” and the “Spirit,” and he challenges them to reject the heavy and fatal yoke of the flesh and accept the light yoke of the Spirit of Jesus. Christian spirituality, according to Paul, proceeds from the initiative of the Holy Spirit and means living in the realm of the “Spirit” as opposed to the “flesh."

In the Gospel, Jesus offers rest to those “who labor and are burdened” if they will accept his “easy yoke and light burden.” By declaring that his “yoke is light,” Jesus means that whatever God sends us is made to fit our needs and our abilities exactly. The second part of Jesus’ claim is: "My burden is light." Jesus does not mean that the burden is easy to carry, but that it is laid on us in love, that it is meant to be carried in love, and that love makes even the heaviest burden light.

Blessings

  • House Calls:Please contact the parish office to set an appointment
  • Cars & Religious articles:Done after any weekday or weekend mass.

Attention

COVID UPDATE

Due to the ongoing Covid-19 Coronavirus Pandemic, Bishop Larry Silva extends the dispensation from the obligation to attend Sunday Mass to all the people of the Diocese of Honolulu and all visitors to the Diocese of Honolulu through August 31, 2020.  All who are able to attend Sunday Mass without putting themselves or others at serious risk of infection; are encouraged to do so, but are not obliged to.

Read more ...

Religous Education

For School Year 2020-2021, some changes will be taking place in the classroom size. Attendance to the Classes will be limited to adhere to the social distancing mandate. Available Classes will be for those children who are preparing or in need of receiving the following sacraments: Reconciliation, Confirmation and Communion.

Read more ...

Finding Us

Christ the Kings Church
20 W. Wakea Ave
Kahului, HI 96732

For directions click here.

Office Hours: 09:00a-03:30p M-F
Closed Holidays

Phone #: 808-877-6098
Fax #: 808-463-3747
Email us using our  Contact Us Form

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